.NET remoting — Quick Look

.NET remoting involves sending messages along channels. Two of the standard channels are HTTP and TCP. TCP is intended for LANs only – HTTP can be used for LANs or WANs (internet).

Support is provided for multiple message serializarion formats. Examples are SOAP (XML-based) and binary. By default, the HTTP channel uses SOAP (via the .NET runtime Serialization SOAP Formatter), and the TCP channel uses binary (via the .NET runtime Serialization Binary Formatter). But either channel can use either serialization format.

There are a number of styles of remote access:
SingleCall. Each incoming request from a client is serviced by a new object. The object is thrown away when the request has finished.
Singleton. All incoming requests from clients are processed by a single server object.
Client-activated object. This is the old stateful (D)COM model whereby the client receives a reference to the remote object and holds that reference (thus keeping the remote object alive) until it is finished with it.
Distributed garbage collection of objects is managed by a system called ‘leased based lifetime’. Each object has a lease time, and when that time expires the object is disconnected from the .NET runtime remoting infrastructure. Objects have a default renew time – the lease is renewed when a successful call is made from the client to the object. The client can also explicitly renew the lease.

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